Monday, July 31, 2006


Iraq, Camus, and The Plague

I leave the readers with a personal anecdote political scientist John Mearsheimer used at the US Naval War College’s Annual Conference on International Strategy when he was asked the question, ‘What is the path to success in Iraq?’:


“I remember once in English class [at West Point Military Academy] we read Albert Camus's book The Plague. I didn't know what The Plague was about or why we were reading it. But afterwards the instructor explained to us that The Plague was being read because of the Vietnam War. What Camus was saying in The Plague was that the plague came and went of its own accord. All sorts of minions ran around trying to deal with the plague, and they operated under the illusion that they could affect the plague one way or another. But the plague operated on its own schedule. That is what we were told was going on in Vietnam. Every time I look at the situation in Iraq today, I think of Vietnam, and I think of The Plague, and I just don't think there's very much we can do at this point. It is just out of our hands. There are forces that we don't have control over that are at play, and will determine the outcome of this one. I understand that's very hard for Americans to understand, because Americans believe that they can shape the world in their interests.”